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The Sea Wolf 116







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Books:

Martin Eden

The Pickwick Papers

The Sea Wolf




The world of books and bookish folk is very vague, more like a dream memory than an actuality. I surely have hunted and forayed and fought all the days of my life. And you, too, seem a part of it. You are--" I was on the verge of saying, "my woman, my mate," but glibly changed it to--"standing the hardship well." But her ear had caught the flaw. She recognized a flight that midmost broke. She gave me a quick look. "Not that. You were saying--?" "That the American Mrs. Meynell was living the life of a savage and living it quite successfully," I said easily. "Oh," was all she replied; but I could have sworn there was a note of disappointment in her voice. But "my woman, my mate" kept ringing in my head for the rest of the day and for many days. Yet never did it ring more loudly than that night, as I watched her draw back the blanket of moss from the coals, blow up the fire, and cook the evening meal. It must have been latent savagery stirring in me, for the old words, so bound up with the roots of the race, to grip me and thrill me. And grip and thrill they did, till I fell asleep, murmuring them to myself over and over again.

CHAPTER XXXI

"It will smell," I said, "but it will keep in the heat and keep out the rain and snow." We were surveying the completed seal-skin roof. "It is clumsy, but it will serve the purpose, and that is the main thing," I went on, yearning for her praise. And she clapped her hands and declared that she was hugely pleased. "But it is dark in here," she said the next moment, her shoulders shrinking with a little involuntary shiver. "You might have suggested a window when the walls were going up," I said. "It was for you, and you should have seen the need of a window." "But I never do see the obvious, you know," she laughed back. "And besides, you can knock a hole in the wall at any time. "Quite true; I had not thought of it," I replied, wagging my head sagely. "But have you thought of ordering the window-glass? Just call up the firm,--Red, 4451, I think it is,--and tell them what size and kind of glass you wish." "That means--" she began. "No window." It was a dark and evil-appearing thing, that hut, not fit for aught better than swine in a civilized land; but for us, who had known the misery of the open boat, it was a snug little habitation. Following the housewarming, which was accomplished by means of seal-oil and a wick made from cotton calking, came the hunting for our winters meat and the building of the second hut. It was a simple affair, now, to go forth in the morning and return by noon with a boatload of seals. And then, while I worked at building the hut, Maud tried out the oil from the blubber and kept a slow fire under the frames of meat. I had heard of jerking beef on the plains, and our seal-meat, cut in thin strips and hung in the smoke, cured excellently. The second hut was easier to erect, for I built it against the first, and only three walls were required. But it was work, hard work, all of it. Maud and I worked from dawn till dark, to the limit of our strength, so that when night came we crawled stiffly to bed and slept the animal-like sleep exhaustion. And yet Maud declared that she had never felt better or stronger in her life. I knew this was true of myself, but hers was such a lily strength that I feared she would break down. Often and often, her last- reserve force gone, I have seen her stretched flat on her back on the sand in the way she had of resting and recuperating. And then she would be up on her feet and toiling hard as ever. Where she obtained this strength was the marvel to me. "Think of the long rest this winter," was her reply to my remonstrances. "Why, well be clamorous for something to do." We held a housewarming in my hut the night it was roofed. It was the end of the third day of a fierce

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