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The Pickwick Papers 32







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and dived into some obscure recesses, from which they speedily produced a bottle of blacking, and some half-dozen brushes. Bustle! said the old gentleman again, but the admonition was quite unnecessary, for one of the girls poured out the cherry brandy, and another brought in the towels, and one of the men suddenly seizing Mr. Pickwick by the leg, at imminent hazard of throwing him off his balance, brushed away at his boot till his corns were red-hot; while the other shampooed Mr. Winkle with a heavy clothes-brush, indulging, during the operation, in that hissing sound which hostlers are wont to produce when engaged in rubbing down a horse. Mr. Snodgrass, having concluded his ablutions, took a survey of the room, while standing with his back to the fire, sipping his cherry brandy with heartfelt satisfaction. He describes it as a large apartment, with a red brick floor and a capacious chimney; the ceiling garnished with hams, sides of bacon, and ropes of onions. The walls were decorated with several hunting-whips, two or three bridles, a saddle, and an old rusty blunderbuss, with an inscription below it, intimating that it was Loaded--as it had been, on the same authority, for half a century at least. An old eight-day clock, of solemn and sedate demeanour, ticked gravely in one corner; and a silver watch, of equal antiquity, dangled from one of the many hooks which ornamented the dresser. Ready? said the old gentleman inquiringly, when his guests had been washed, mended, brushed, and brandied. Quite, replied Mr. Pickwick. Come along, then; and the party having traversed several dark passages, and being joined by Mr. Tupman, who had lingered behind to snatch a kiss from Emma, for which he had been duly rewarded with sundry pushings and scratchings, arrived at the parlour door. Welcome, said their hospitable host, throwing it open and stepping forward to announce them, welcome, gentlemen, to Manor Farm.

CHAPTER VI

AN OLD-FASHIONED CARD-PARTY--THE CLERGYMANS VERSES--THE STORY OF THE CONVICTS RETURN

Several guests who were assembled in the old parlour rose to greet Mr. Pickwick and his friends upon their entrance; and during the performance of the ceremony of introduction, with all due formalities, Mr. Pickwick had leisure to observe the appearance, and speculate upon the characters and pursuits, of the persons by whom he was surrounded--a habit in which he, in common with many other great men, delighted to indulge. A very old lady, in a lofty cap and faded silk gown--no less a personage than Mr. Wardles mother--occupied the post of honour on the right-hand corner of the chimney-piece; and various certificates of her having been brought up in the way she should go when young, and of her not having departed from it when old, ornamented the walls, in the form of samplers of ancient date, worsted landscapes of equal antiquity, and crimson silk tea-kettle holders of a more modern period. The aunt, the two young ladies, and Mr. Wardle, each vying with the other in paying zealous and unremitting attentions to the old lady, crowded round her easy-chair, one holding her ear-trumpet, another an orange, and a third a smelling-bottle, while a fourth was busily engaged in patting and punching the pillows which were arranged for her support. On the opposite side sat a bald- headed old gentleman, with a good-humoured, benevolent face-- the clergyman of Dingley Dell; and next him sat his wife, a stout, blooming old lady, who looked as if she were well skilled, not only in the art and mystery of manufacturing home-made cordials greatly to other peoples satisfaction, but of tasting them occasionally very much to her own. A little hard-headed, Ripstone pippin-faced man, was conversing with a fat old gentleman in one corner; and two or three more old gentlemen, and two or three more old ladies, sat bolt upright and motionless on their chairs, staring very hard at Mr. Pickwick and his fellow-voyagers. Mr. Pickwick, mother, said Mr. Wardle, at the very top of his voice. Ah! said the old lady, shaking her head; I cant hear you. Mr. Pickwick, grandma! screamed both the young ladies together. Ah! exclaimed the old lady. Well, it dont much matter. He dont care for an old ooman like me, I dare say. I assure you, maam, said Mr. Pickwick, grasping the old ladys hand, and speaking so loud that the exertion imparted a crimson hue to his benevolent countenance--I assure you, maam, that nothing delights me more than to see a lady of your time of life heading so fine a family, and looking so

The Pickwick Papers page 31        The Pickwick Papers page 33