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The Pickwick Papers 301







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The Pickwick Papers

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if it had been Newgate, it would ha been just the same. Now the murders out, and, damme, theres an end on it! With these words, which he repeated with great emphasis and violence, Sam Weller dashed his hat upon the ground, in a most unusual state of excitement; and then, folding his arms, looked firmly and fixedly in his masters face.

CHAPTER LXIV

TREATS OF DIVERS LITTLE MATTERS WHICH OCCURRED IN THE FLEET, AND OF Mr. WINKLES MYSTERIOUS BEHAVIOUR; AND SHOWS HOW THE POOR CHANCERY PRISONER OBTAINED HIS RELEASE AT LAST

Mr. Pickwick felt a great deal too much touched by the warmth of Sams attachment, to be able to exhibit any manifestation of anger or displeasure at the precipitate course he had adopted, in voluntarily consigning himself to a debtors prison for an indefinite period. The only point on which he persevered in demanding an explanation, was, the name of Sams detaining creditor; but this Mr. Weller as perseveringly withheld. It aint o no use, sir, said Sam, again and again; hes a malicious, bad-disposed, vorldly-minded, spiteful, windictive creetur, with a hard heart as there aint no softnin, as the wirtuous clergyman remarked of the old genlmn with the dropsy, ven he said, that upon the whole he thought hed rayther leave his property to his vife than build a chapel vith it. But consider, Sam, Mr. Pickwick remonstrated, the sum is so small that it can very easily be paid; and having made up My mind that you shall stop with me, you should recollect how much more useful you would be, if you could go outside the walls. Wery much obliged to you, sir, replied Mr. Weller gravely; but Id rayther not. Rather not do what, Sam? Wy, Id rayther not let myself down to ask a favour o this here unremorseful enemy. But it is no favour asking him to take his money, Sam, reasoned Mr. Pickwick. Beg your pardon, sir, rejoined Sam, but it ud be a wery great favour to pay it, and he dont deserve none; thats where it is, sir. Here Mr. Pickwick, rubbing his nose with an air of some vexation, Mr. Weller thought it prudent to change the theme of the discourse. I takes my determination on principle, Sir, remarked Sam, and you takes yours on the same ground; wich puts me in mind o the man as killed his-self on principle, wich o course youve heerd on, Sir. Mr. Weller paused when he arrived at this point, and cast a comical look at his master out of the corners of his eyes. There is no "of course" in the case, Sam, said Mr. Pickwick, gradually breaking into a smile, in spite of the uneasiness which Sams obstinacy had given him. The fame of the gentleman in question, never reached my ears. No, sir! exclaimed Mr. Weller. You astonish me, Sir; he wos a clerk in a govment office, sir. Was he? said Mr. Pickwick. Yes, he wos, Sir, rejoined Mr. Weller; and a wery pleasant genlmn too--one o the precise and tidy sort, as puts their feet in little India-rubber fire-buckets wen its wet weather, and never has no other bosom friends but hare-skins; he saved up his money on principle, wore a clean shirt evry day on principle; never spoke to none of his relations on principle, fear they shoud want to borrow money of him; and wos altogether, in fact, an uncommon agreeable character. He had his hair cut on principle vunce a fortnight, and contracted for his clothes on the economic principle--three suits a year, and send back the old uns. Being a wery reglar genlmn, he dind evry day at the same place, where it was one-and-nine to cut off the joint, and a wery good one-and-nines worth he used to cut, as the landlord often said, with the tears a-tricklin down his face, let alone the way he used to poke the fire in the vinter time, which wos a dead loss o four-pence hapenny a day, to say nothin at all o the aggrawation o seein him do it. So uncommon grand with it too! "POST arter the next genlmn," he sings out evry day ven he comes in. "See arter the TIMES, Thomas; let me look at the MORNIN HERALD, when its out o hand; dont forget to bespeak the CHRONICLE; and just bring the TIZER, vill you:" and then hed set vith his eyes fixed on the clock, and rush out, just a

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