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The Pickwick Papers 25







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Books:

Martin Eden

The Pickwick Papers

The Sea Wolf




here this morning, and very glad I was to see him. Well, Sir, and how are you? You do look uncommon well, to be sure. Mr. Pickwick acknowledged the compliment, and cordially shook hands with the stout gentleman in the top-boots. Well, and how are you, sir? said the stout gentleman, addressing Mr. Snodgrass with paternal anxiety. Charming, eh? Well, thats right--thats right. And how are you, sir (to Mr. Winkle)? Well, I am glad to hear you say you are well; very glad I am, to be sure. My daughters, gentlemen--my gals these are; and thats my sister, Miss Rachael Wardle. Shes a Miss, she is; and yet she aint a Miss--eh, Sir, eh? And the stout gentleman playfully inserted his elbow between the ribs of Mr. Pickwick, and laughed very heartily. Lor, brother! said Miss Wardle, with a deprecating smile. True, true, said the stout gentleman; no one can deny it. Gentlemen, I beg your pardon; this is my friend Mr. Trundle. And now you all know each other, lets be comfortable and happy, and see whats going forward; thats what I say. So the stout gentleman put on his spectacles, and Mr. Pickwick pulled out his glass, and everybody stood up in the carriage, and looked over somebody elses shoulder at the evolutions of the military. Astounding evolutions they were, one rank firing over the heads of another rank, and then running away; and then the other rank firing over the heads of another rank, and running away in their turn; and then forming squares, with officers in the centre; and then descending the trench on one side with scaling- ladders, and ascending it on the other again by the same means; and knocking down barricades of baskets, and behaving in the most gallant manner possible. Then there was such a ramming down of the contents of enormous guns on the battery, with instruments like magnified mops; such a preparation before they were let off, and such an awful noise when they did go, that the air resounded with the screams of ladies. The young Misses Wardle were so frightened, that Mr. Trundle was actually obliged to hold one of them up in the carriage, while Mr. Snodgrass supported the other; and Mr. Wardles sister suffered under such a dreadful state of nervous alarm, that Mr. Tupman found it indispensably necessary to put his arm round her waist, to keep her up at all. Everybody was excited, except the fat boy, and he slept as soundly as if the roaring of cannon were his ordinary lullaby. Joe, Joe! said the stout gentleman, when the citadel was taken, and the besiegers and besieged sat down to dinner. Damn that boy, hes gone to sleep again. Be good enough to pinch him, sir--in the leg, if you please; nothing else wakes him--thank you. Undo the hamper, Joe. The fat boy, who had been effectually roused by the compression of a portion of his leg between the finger and thumb of Mr. Winkle, rolled off the box once again, and proceeded to unpack the hamper with more expedition than could have been expected from his previous inactivity. Now we must sit close, said the stout gentleman. After a great many jokes about squeezing the ladies sleeves, and a vast quantity of blushing at sundry jocose proposals, that the ladies should sit in the gentlemens laps, the whole party were stowed down in the barouche; and the stout gentleman proceeded to hand the things from the fat boy (who had mounted up behind for the purpose) into the carriage. Now, Joe, knives and forks. The knives and forks were handed in, and the ladies and gentlemen inside, and Mr. Winkle on the box, were each furnished with those useful instruments. Plates, Joe, plates. A similar process employed in the distribution of the crockery. Now, Joe, the fowls. Damn that boy; hes gone to sleep again. Joe! Joe! (Sundry taps on the head with a stick, and the fat boy, with some difficulty, roused from his lethargy.) Come, hand in the eatables. There was something in the sound of the last word which roused the unctuous boy. He jumped up, and the leaden eyes which twinkled behind his mountainous cheeks leered horribly upon the food as he unpacked it from the basket. Now make haste, said Mr. Wardle; for the fat boy was hanging fondly over a capon, which he seemed wholly unable to part with. The boy sighed deeply, and, bestowing an ardent gaze upon its plumpness,

The Pickwick Papers page 24        The Pickwick Papers page 26