WATCH Hot Elisha Cuthbert Showing All
Hot Elisha Cuthbert at MrSkin
CLICK HERE for Instant Access



Elisha Cuthbert Photos
Martin Eden 123







Elisha Cuthbert Photos



Books:

Martin Eden

The Pickwick Papers

The Sea Wolf




incident after she had gone, and once or twice broke out into laughter that was bitter as he saw his sister and her betrothed, all the members of his own class and the members of Ruths class, directing their narrow little lives by narrow little formulas--herd-creatures, flocking together and patterning their lives by one anothers opinions, failing of being individuals and of really living life because of the childlike formulas by which they were enslaved. He summoned them before him in apparitional procession: Bernard Higginbotham arm in arm with Mr. Butler, Hermann von Schmidt cheek by jowl with Charley Hapgood, and one by one and in pairs he judged them and dismissed them--judged them by the standards of intellect and morality he had learned from the books. Vainly he asked: Where are the great souls, the great men and women? He found them not among the careless, gross, and stupid intelligences that answered the call of vision to his narrow room. He felt a loathing for them such as Circe must have felt for her swine. When he had dismissed the last one and thought himself alone, a late-comer entered, unexpected and unsummoned. Martin watched him and saw the stiff-rim, the square-cut, double-breasted coat and the swaggering shoulders, of the youthful hoodlum who had once been he. "You were like all the rest, young fellow," Martin sneered. "Your morality and your knowledge were just the same as theirs. You did not think and act for yourself. Your opinions, like your clothes, were ready made; your acts were shaped by popular approval. You were cock of your gang because others acclaimed you the real thing. You fought and ruled the gang, not because you liked to,--you know you really despised it,--but because the other fellows patted you on the shoulder. You licked Cheese- Face because you wouldnt give in, and you wouldnt give in partly because you were an abysmal brute and for the rest because you believed what every one about you believed, that the measure of manhood was the carnivorous ferocity displayed in injuring and marring fellow-creatures anatomies. Why, you whelp, you even won other fellows girls away from them, not because you wanted the girls, but because in the marrow of those about you, those who set your moral pace, was the instinct of the wild stallion and the bull-seal. Well, the years have passed, and what do you think about it now?" As if in reply, the vision underwent a swift metamorphosis. The stiff- rim and the square-cut vanished, being replaced by milder garments; the toughness went out of the face, the hardness out of the eyes; and, the face, chastened and refined, was irradiated from an inner life of communion with beauty and knowledge. The apparition was very like his present self, and, as he regarded it, he noted the student-lamp by which it was illuminated, and the book over which it pored. He glanced at the title and read, "The Science of AEsthetics." Next, he entered into the apparition, trimmed the student-lamp, and himself went on reading "The Science of AEsthetics."

CHAPTER XXX

On a beautiful fall day, a day of similar Indian summer to that which had seen their love declared the year before, Martin read his "Love-cycle" to Ruth. It was in the afternoon, and, as before, they had ridden out to their favorite knoll in the hills. Now and again she had interrupted his reading with exclamations of pleasure, and now, as he laid the last sheet of manuscript with its fellows, he waited her judgment. She delayed to speak, and at last she spoke haltingly, hesitating to frame in words the harshness of her thought. "I think they are beautiful, very beautiful," she said; "but you cant sell them, can you? You see what I mean," she said, almost pleaded. "This writing of yours is not practical. Something is the matter--maybe it is with the market--that prevents you from earning a living by it. And please, dear, dont misunderstand me. I am flattered, and made proud, and all that--I could not be a true woman were it otherwise--that you should write these poems to me. But they do not make our marriage possible. Dont you see, Martin? Dont think me mercenary. It is love, the thought of our future, with which I am burdened. A whole year has gone by since we learned

Martin Eden page 122        Martin Eden page 124